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Indiana Travel Guide

Indiana — Transportation

Indiana Taxis and Car Rental

Indiana deserves its nickname The Crossroads of America, as it indeed lies at the junction of several major interstate highways. Getting to Indiana is a breeze from any direction, which makes having a car the preferable way to go if you plan to do any kind of traveling within the state. Car rental can be found at all major airports and in the downtown areas of most large cities like Indianapolis, Bloomington, South Bend, and Fort Wayne. With little help from public transportation, a rental car is essential to getting to the rural attractions that make Indiana so special.

Taxis are available only in the larger cities such as Indianapolis, Bloomington, South, Gary, and South Bend. They tend to park in front of major hotels in downtown areas, but can also be conveniently ordered by phone. Yellow Cab (+1-317-487-7777) is a good choice for Indianapolis, while Blue Ribbon Taxi (+1-574-233-4040) is in South Bend. All taxis in Indiana use meters for the fares, which are quite reasonable considering the distances required to move around the state’s main cities.

Indiana Trains and Buses

The Amtrak train network passes through Indiana on three different lines. The Hoosier State Line runs between Indianapolis and Chicago, while the Cardinal Line goes from Chicago to New York passing through Indiana on its way. Both of these routes make stops in Indianapolis, Crawfordsville, Connersville, Rensselaer, Dyer, and Lafayette. The Midwest Corridor Line goes from Chicago to Cincinnati with stops in Connersville, Lafayette, and Indianapolis. The Amtrak train is a fun and scenic ways to travel from other parts of America. Fares are reasonable and often comparable to domestic flights, but the views of Middle America are unbeatable and the seats comfortable.

The Greyhound bus is the most popular means of travel to Indiana and between its towns and cities. The buses reach every town in the state and have very cheap fares. Seats are nothing special, but comfortable enough for a journey of a few hours. Most Greyhound bus stations are located right in the downtown area of any major city.

No city in Indiana has a metro subway or light rail network. Indianapolis has a decent public bus system known as IndyGo that is cheap and useful for moving between districts and areas. There are also free Red Line Circulator buses that run in a loop around the downtown core, useful for both a free sightseeing jaunt and limited transportation. For anywhere outside of Indy, you will need a taxi or rental car to get around the state and between cities.

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