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Liberia Travel Guide

Liberia — Festivals and Events

One of the joys of festivals in Liberia is that everyone is welcome to join in, irrespective of the occasion. Christian, Muslim and cultural events are enjoyed by everyone, whatever their beliefs or tribal cultures, with two of the favorites, Christmas and Eid al Fitr, a cause for celebration in every corner of the state.

New Year’s Day

The hallmark of all Liberian festivals is the enthusiasm with which they’re celebrated, with New Year's Day a shining example. Expect parties, musical performances, dance, song, traditional drumming, lots of eating and drinking and fireworks and bonfires on both New Year’s Eve and Day.

Easter

Christianity is the major religion here, with Easter its main holiday, celebrated in March/April according to the Gregorian calendar. Church services and family get-togethers are the main events, and aren’t restricted to the community as all are welcome to take part in the fun.

Independence Day

Independence Day falls annually on July 26, which is a national holiday. Monrovia hosts official events and parades, and parties across the land.

Eid al Fitr

The Islamic festival of Eid al Fitr brings an end the holy month of Ramadan, held during July or August depending on the Islamic calendar. It’s a joyful event celebrating the end of fasting with free-flowing traditional food and family gatherings throughout Liberia.

Thanksgiving Day

As a result of the freed slaves from America’s southern states, Thanksgiving is still celebrated in Liberia on November 4 in honor of the link between the two countries.

Monrovia Children’s Day Festival

Held every November in Monrovia’s Sports Stadium, the Children’s Festival brings together thousands of young people from Liberia to celebrate their country’s achievements. Interactive games, sports contests, live music and celebrity performances mark the occasion.

Christmas

Christmas on December 25 is the nation’s favorite holiday, with preparations for the big day lasting weeks in advance. It’s a secular and religious event, with Liberia’s Muslims celebrating with special meals and family get-togethers, and Christians attending church services.

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