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Kansas Travel Guide

Kansas — Transportation

Kansas Taxis and Car Rental

Kansas is literally located in the geographical center of America. Interstate 70 is the main highway running through Kansas east to west from St Louis, Missouri to Denver, Colorado and onward in both directions. Interstate 35 is the main highway running north to south through Kansas.

Having your own car is essential if you plan to do any sort of sightseeing or travel in the state, and is actually a big part of the Kansas experience. All of the major car rental firms have offices in the downtowns of major cities like Topeka, Wichita, and Kansas City, as well as at airports. Driving the flat roads of Kansas is easy except during winter when big storms can dump ice and snow in your path. If you plan to drive during the winter months, be prepared. The Kansas Road and Weather Conditions Hotline (+1-877-511-5368) gives updated information on all the state’s roads.

Taxis are available in all of the large cities, but not in the small rural towns. They all use meters to determine the fares, which are reasonable because Kansas cities tend to be small. In Topeka, Capitol City Taxi (+1-785-267-3777) is a good choice, while Kansas City Taxi (+1-816-471-5000) covers Kansas City.

Kansas Trains and Buses

If you have the time to spare, traveling to and through Kansas on the train is an unparalleled way to experience the rolling countryside of Midwest America. Train lines runs where roads do not go, offering unique views of the landscape and wildlife. Amtrak has a major line running right through Kansas called the Southwest Chief. It runs between Los Angeles and Chicago every day, stopping at Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka, Hutchinson, Newton, Dodge City, and Garden City. Amtrak trains also connect Kansas City with St Louis, Missouri. The trains are comfortable though the fares are equivalent to that of a regional flight.

The cheapest means of travel to and around Kansas remains the bus. Both the Greyhound and Jefferson Lines run extensive service throughout the state. The fares are low, especially between destinations within Kansas, and the seats are reasonably comfortable. There are no toilets on Greyhound buses, so be prepared. Only the main cities like Topeka, Kansas City, Lawrence, and Wichita have public bus networks. They are mainly used by local residents to move between the suburbs and downtown, so they will not be very practical for tourists. Bus fares are, however, cheap.

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