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Prince Edward Island Travel Guide

Prince Edward Island — Food and Restaurants

All-you–can-eat lobster suppers remain Prince Edward Island’s claim to fame, but the province has expanded its culinary horizons beyond potatoes and seafood. Charlottetown’s longtime Lebanese community has contributed quality Middle Eastern restaurants to the provincial capital and fine dining is served up at its eastern tip at the Inn of Bay Fortune, most famously as the setting of the Food Network’s popular Inn Chef show. Some of PEI’s liveliest nightlife happens at Charlottetown’s Victoria Row, which is closed to motorized traffic in summer.

Bars and Pubbing in Prince Edward Island

Most Prince Edward Island watering holes specialize in relaxation, not wild parties. The Gahan House Pub (126 Sydney Street, Charlottetown), the province’s only microbrewery, provides regular guided tours in the summer and samples of its six house ales along with standard pub fare. The neighboring Olde Dublin Pub (131 Sydney Street, Charlottetown) occasionally serves roast beef and lobster suppers with live Celtic musical performances.

Summerside’s hottest pubs include the Olde Tap Room (311 Market Street, Summerside), whose Wednesday wing deal is frequently accompanied by live music, and Dooly’s (298 Water Street, Summerside), which offers a laid-back atmosphere filled with pool tables, board games, and televisions.

Bars may not be easy to find outside of Prince Edward Island’s two largest cities, but even smallest towns have their own renowned watering holes, such as the Cross Keys Bar and Grill (7788 St Peter’s Road, Morell), which has the province’s political history on display. The Landing Oyster House and Pub (1327 Port Hill Station Road, Tyne Valley) serves up freshly shucked oysters and live music at Prince Edward Island’s opposite end. However, many of the liveliest celebrations take place at kitchen parties frequently held in local homes.

Dining and Cuisine in Prince Edward Island

One of Charlottetown’s most famous Lebanese restaurants is Cedar’s Eatery (81 University Avenue, Charlottetown), which serves falafel, shawarma, yabrak, and other Middle Eastern favorites until 11:00 p.m. Formosa Tea Room (186 Prince Street, Charlottetown) may be Prince Edward Island’s sole vegetarian restaurant, but even the most hardcore carnivores can enjoy the generous noodle bowls, dim sum, and large Asian tea selection here.

Summerside’s Brothers Two Restaurant (618 Water Street, Summerside) has become nearly as famous for its summer and Christmas feast dinner theaters as for the wide variety of food on its extensive menu. FiveEleven West (511 Notre Dame Street, Summerside) is the other fine dining restaurant in Prince Edward Island’s second biggest city.

Visitors wanting to enjoy one of Prince Edward Island’s traditional lobster suppers are most likely to find them in the central part of the province. Fisherman’s Wharf (7230 Rustico Road, North Rustico) is the place to go for its 60 foot, all-you-can-eat salad bar. One of eastern Prince Edward Island’s most popular haunts, Cardigan Lobster Suppers (4557 Wharf Road, Cardigan), is just a five-minute drive from the Dundarave and Brudenell golf courses.

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