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Dominican Republic Travel Guide

Dominican Republic — Transportation

Dominican Republic Taxis and Car Rental

The Dominican Republic’s most dependable taxi companies are Tecni-Taxi (+1-809-567-2010 in Santo Domingo, +1-809-320-7621 in Puerto Plata) and Taxi Cabarete/Sosua (+1-809-571-0767). Dominican taxis are fairly affordable, but visitors should avoid unmarked street cabs, where robberies and assaults have been known to occur in recent years. Motorists drive on the right in the Dominican Republic and getting a rental car is practical and easily available across the country, but fuel can be fairly expensive. The biggest challenge drivers will face are poor road conditions in rural areas, Santo Domingo’s narrow streets, military checkpoints near the Haitian border, and local drivers who make up their own rules of the road.

Dominican Republic Water Taxis

In addition to growing numbers of international cruise ships, there is also regular service between Santo Domingo and two Puerto Rican ports, San Juan and Mayaguez on Ferries Del Caribe. These boats take roughly 12 hours to travel get between the two Caribbean countries, an overnight journey usually made three times per week.

Dominican Republic Trains and Buses

The Dominican Republic has no rail network, but most of its communities are well-linked by small minibuses called guaguas, larger North American-style buses, or both. Santo Domingo-based Caribe Tours is the Dominican Republic’s largest and most widespread inter-city bus company. Rates are reasonable and service runs between 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., stopping in most major communities. Passengers on these air-conditioned buses should bring sweaters as it does get fairly chilly on these luxury rides complete with movies and stops for lunch and coffee on longer journeys.

Most other Dominican Republic bus companies are much smaller, independently owned, and only travel between a handful of communities. Passengers wishing to travel aboard guaguas should expect heavy crowds and frequent stops to pick up more people. Although guaguas vary dramatically in comfort level and cease operations after sunset, they are generally safe and people are generally willing to help tourists out. Guagua passengers should, however, watch out for the occasional pickpocket.

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