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Mauritania Travel Guide

Mauritania — Attractions

Mauritania’s natural landscape is diverse, offering travelers a great deal of attractions to explore and enjoy. Whether it’s roaming the deserted towns or marveling at a unique desert-like national park, there are enough places to see to keep everyone busy. There are also several historical and cultural sites which are great for travelers who want to learn more about this interesting slice of Africa.

Banc d’Arguin National Park

The country’s most popular attraction is Banc d’Arguin National Park. This UNESCO World Heritage site is home to one of the world’s largest bird sanctuaries and is an absolute must for bird lovers. Everything from pink flamingos, royal terns and gull-billed terns to white pelicans, grey pelicans and broad-billed sandpipers can be found here. Travelers can embark on a special boat trip in the park, which is the best way to see its inhabitants in their full glory. Spanning a vast area of over 120 miles, the park is a beautiful mixture of desert, coastal islands and sea. There are also a few archeological sites in the park which are worth a visit.
Address: Northwestern Mauritania
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Ouadâne

A UNESCO World Heritage site, Ouadane is an old-fashioned ghost town if there ever was one. Founded in 1147 by the Berber population who occupied the land, it is located in the desert region of Central Mauritania and seems to rise from the golden sands like a mirage. This oasis is home to several old buildings and houses, 14th century mosques and gorgeous gardens. What was once a lively and successful caravan trade center today is a deserted relic of the past. The town has a highly informative museum where travelers can learn more about the country and its history.
Address: Central Mauritania
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Adrar

Directly translated from Berber, Adrar means "mountain" and is indeed the most famous mountain in the country. The Adrar plateau is a stunning sierra characterized by shades of brown and pink desert rock. The area is well-known for its shifting sand dunes, plummeting canyons, stony desert areas, and in some parts, welcoming palm groves. The land was settled way back in the Neolithic area so there are several archeological sites displaying human life and activities of the past.
Address: Northern Mauritania
Phone: n/a
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Port de Pêche

The most famous landmark in the capital, Port de Pêche, is a colorful and buzzing boardwalk and fishing port on the west side of Nouakchott. Not only is the view from the pier breathtaking, but the activities of the fisherman coming in after a long day at sea is enchanting. Hundreds of local men drag pounds of nets from their sailing vessels onto the shore to the fish mongers, who skillfully fillet the catches to sell at the nearby market. The port is easily reached by taxi and the best time to visit is in the afternoon when the trawlers are docked.
Address: Western Nouakchott
Phone: n/a
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National Museum

One of the best museums in the country, the National Museum provides travelers great insight into the history and culture of Mauritania. This multi-tiered building is well established, boasting a comprehensive collection of artifacts and archaeological exhibitions which tell the story of the small west African nation from the ins and outs of traditional Moorish culture to the way of life in modern day. 
Address: Rue Mohamedel Habib, Nouakchott
Phone: n/a
Website: n/a

Grande Mosquée

Located in the southwest part of Nouakchott, the Grand Mosquee or, as it is locally known, the Mosquee Saudique, is hard to miss. The city’s skyline is dominated by tall, slender minarets of this religious site and tourist landmark. The mosque is open on certain days for visitors to explore, but be respectful and dress conservatively.
Address: Rue Alioune, Nouakchott
Phone: n/a
Website: n/a

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