Dominican Republic travel tips: Head to Damajaqua Cascades

Images of Damajaqua Cascades (27 Waterfalls), Puerto Plata

Travelers who are planning a Caribbean vacation may want to brush up on some before heading off to the the island nation. While this country offers spectacular hotels on pristine white-sand beaches, one of the worst things visitors can do is stay in their resorts throughout their entire trip. There are so many other attractions the Dominican Republic has to offer beyond its hotel walls.

For example, one of the most popular tourist attractions on the island is Damajaqua Cascades, also called 27 Waterfalls, in Puerto Plata. With admission to the park, travelers will follow an English-speaking guide to the site of the country’s most beautiful waterfalls. Each cascade is located within the hills of the Northern Corridor, nestled just behind a field of sugar cane. The 27 waterfalls spill into their own glistening pools, created by walls of limestone.

After a 25-minute hike to the falls, visitors and their guides will find their first waterfall, known as “The Virgin.” Dominican legend says that the Taino Indians who originally lived on the land built a statue of Altagracia, the virgin saint of the nation, next to this cascade. While time has swept away any evidence of this tale, the history of the falls lives on in the memory of many Dominicans.

Depending on which option visitors decide to purchase, they will continue on the nature trail to either the seventh, 12th or 27th waterfall. Guests have the opportunity to climb each towering cascade with the assistance of their guides. Then, in order to get back down, they are invited to jump from the top, landing in a sparkling pool at the bottom. For safety purposes, life jackets and helmets are given to each participant.

Many people who come to the Dominican Republic’s Damajaqua Cascades say that one of the most exciting waterfalls is one known as “La Tinajita.” In Spanish, this word means “small jar,” but also refers to tiny containers that farmers once used to store water. This cascade has this unique name because it has a similar shape as the jars. Unlike most waterfalls, La Tinajita looks like a waterslide, with curved edges rising up on either side. This unique shape gives travelers a wild ride down to the natural pool waiting at the bottom.

As tourists complete their adventure in Damajaqua Cascades, exploring everything from caves to pools filled with crabs, they will be glad they ventured out of their hotel rooms to discover one of the island’s natural wonders.

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